Friday, December 7, 2012

Welcome!



Welcome to the premier edition of the Welcome House Adoptive Families Blog. 

For more than 60 years, Welcome House has been building families through child adoption. More than 7,000 children have been matched with forever families. However, our success does not equate to a number. The heart of the matter is that the work that we have done for over six decades has impacted the hearts of many- both within families and within the communities in which our adoptive families reside.  Our history as a Bucks County-based child adoption program is rich with wonderful stories of multicultural appreciation and love exhibited through adoption.

Last month during National Adoption Month we asked our Facebook fans and Welcome House families to share their adoption stories with us. The winning entry is from a Korean adoptee who wrote about the wonderful opportunity adoption afforded her and her parents.

Here is an excerpt from her entry:

My Korean mother put me up for adoption because she was a young, poor, unwed mother of a mixed child. I had a few problems in Korea because I was half-American. My Korean mother put me up for adoption so that I may have an opportunity for a brighter future. My American family provided me with that opportunity. I would not be where I am today without my mother’s unselfish act and my American family’s unselfish hearts. 

My parents have opened my eyes and my mind to a whole new world. My parents have introduced me to theater, orchestra, travel and art. Had I lived in Korea, I would not have had these opportunities. They have taught me the value of family. They taught me not to “judge a book by its cover” and how to keep an open mind. I am a pretty well rounded individual due to their teachings. 

My parents are my guardian angels. They have given me a real chance at life. My Korean mother’s unselfish act and my American family’s unselfish hearts have given me a life I couldn’t have ever imagined. I may not have been born under my American family’s hearts, but I was born in it.

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